Consumption & Ripening guide

 

As with the more common banana, exotic fruits become sweeter as they ripen.  Therefore, we recommend using our guide to determine when your fruits have produced the most sugars and are at their tastiest.  As well as this guide we recommend browsing youtube videos if you're new to a particular fruit in order to familarise yourself with certain characteristics.

Apple Banana: Start green but turn yellow and softer as they ripen.  When brown/black spots begin to appear then the fruit is very sweet & creamy

Atemoya (Sugar Apple): Will become softer and indent slightly when slight pressure is applied.  Also, in between the ridges, they will also become wider and more apparent as a sign that the fruit is ready to eat.

Baby Pineapple: Outer skin will turn a yellow-orange color and the fruit will produce a slightly sweet distinct aroma.  It will be slightly softer and indent slighty when squeezed.

Banana Red Dacca:  As the the fruit ripens the red becomes deeper.  The banana will also become softer as it ripens.

Breadfruit:  Most breadfruit varieties go from a green to yellow with brown specs as they ripen.  Can be cooked in a variety of methods with wide range of foods and can also be eaten raw when very ripe.  This a very versatile fruit and can be cooked in a variety of ways so we advice you to explore the possibilities with  breadfruit. 

Cherimoya:  Store at room temperature to ripen.  When ripe these fruits will no longer be hard on the touch but instead be rather soft and should give way under gentle pressure. When ripe they can be put in the fridge to last a while longer. Open apart using hands ripe or with a knife.  Sweet flesh can be eaten by mouth straight from the hands or scooped using a spoon.  DO NOT EAT SEEDS as they can be toxic.

DragonFruit: Store at room temperature to ripe.  Visual cues include when the wings (leafy part which extend from the fruit) begin to turn brown and wither.  Conversely if these wing tips are still colorful then they may still be under-ripe.  If slight dark spots appear then the fruit may be ripe too, although too many dark blotches may be signs of over ripeness.  Touch cues include a slight soft feel when ripe.  Too firm and mushy feelings indicate signs of under-ripe and over-ripeness respectively.  Store in fridge when ripe to preserve a little longer.  Cut the fruit in half and use a spoon to scoop out the juicy flesh.

Durian: Signs of ripeness include: Smell - If there is no distinct smell then it is not ripe, the stronger the smell the riper the fruit,  Shaking - Hold to ear and shake the fruit, this is because the flesh is soft and allows for the seed to bang around the inside.  If overripe then the seed will rattle around with no resistance and if you can't hear a rattle then it means the fruit is hard.  Hit it - Using a stick or knife, if it sounds hollow then the flesh is soft and ready.  Different levels of hollowness generally indicate varying levels of ripeness. 

Egg fruit:  Gets softer to touch and indents slightly under pressure from fingers.  Yellow color may deepen brown specs may appear during.  When very ripe is will pull apart revealing the creamy, soft pulp.  Ripe egg fruit can be further preserved in the fridge.

Golden Kiwi:  Ripe when it is no longer hard and yield slightly to pressure.  It is also slightly plump and more fragrant when ready.

Grenadilla: Store at room temperature to ripen. Look for fruit with slight wrinkles which indicate ripening.  The more wrinkly the riper they tend to be so avoid consuming perfectly smooth fruit.  They should also be soft and indent slightly to pressure. Store in the fridge once ripe to preserve a little longer.  Cut ripe fruit in half and scoop out the pulp and seeds with a spoon.  This can be eaten straight with the seed also or added to other dishes.

Jackfruit: Will get softer as it ripens, it should indent under slight pressure from fingers too.  It will also emit a tropical scent as it ripens and will be more profound.  To consume cut fruit in half and remove the pods.  Separate the arils from the seed and consume the sweet arils.

Mamey Sapote: It will no longer be firm but be slightly soft when gentle pressure is applied.  The tip and base should be a little squish too.  Too consume cut in half vertically and remove the seed.  Consume the bright orange flesh within.

Mango: Store at room temperature.  Squeeze gently in the palm, if it indents slightly then it is probably ripe.  If the mango doesn't indent slightly and is still hard then it needs further ripening.  Store in fridge to preserve further.  Peel skin and consume the entire flesh without the seed.

Maracuya: Store at room temperature to ripen. Look for fruit with slight wrinkles which indicate ripening.  The more wrinkly the riper they tend to be so avoid consuming perfectly smooth fruit.  They should also be soft and indent slightly to pressure. Store in the fridge once ripe to preserve a little longer.  Cut ripe fruit in half and scoop out the pulp and seeds with a spoon.  This can be eaten straight with the seed also or added to other dishes.

Papaya: Will do from a green to yellow color as it ripens.  The fruit will as become softer and indent under slight pressure.

Physalis: The husk will go get drier the riper the fruit gets.  The fruit itself will go from green to orange/yellow as it ripens.  The more orange it gets, the riper.

Prickly Pear: Green when unripe.  Depending on the variety, they turn deep red or bright yellow but are always green when unripe.

Feijoa (Pineapple Guava): Store at Room Temperature to ripen.  Under-ripe Feijoa will have a white jelly centre.  Overripe Feijoas will have a brown jelly like center.  Light brown Feijoas which are slightly soft to the touch are optimal and have the sweetest taste.

Figs: They will become softer when ripening and mushy when very ripe.  The skin can be eaten too and the tiny seeds within the flesh are also edible.  To consume, cut in half and consume inner contents or pinch the base and peel the entire fruit skin apart and eat entire fruit.

Kiwano: Store at room temperature to ripen.  Ripe Kiwanos are not too soft to touch and not too hard either.  They also have a deep orange color as opposed to an unripe light yellowish color.  Store in the fridge once ripened to preserve further.  You can 'drink' it by cutting it in half and squeezing the entire contents in your mouth.  Alternatively, you can scoop the contents out by spoon including the seeds.

Kumquats: Store at room temperature to ripen.  They are usually ripe when bright orange and firm.  Once ripe they can be stored in the fridge to preserve further.  Unlike most citrus fruit this can be eaten with the peel - which is generally the sweeter part of the fruit making it useful as a fish garnish also.

Longan: Delivered ripe and ideally shouldn’t be stored for longer than 3 days at room temperature as they don’t keep too well.  Can be placed in the fridge to preserve for slightly longer.  Fruit should be soft and give slightly when pressed but shouldn’t be too soft which are usually signs of over ripeness.  Usually peeled by digging a fingernail/knife into the skin and then using fingers to peel surrounding skin from the rest of the fruit.  All fresh is edible, seeds should not be consumed.

Mangosteen: Store at room temperature to ripen. Can be stored in the fridge to preserve a little longer.  Red-purple Mangosteen are at the early ripe stages and a deep purple Mangosteen are very ripe and must be consumed within two days before they become overripe.  Remove green cap and apply gentle pressure around the fruit along a line and it should give way.  If its a little tough then use a knife and cut around the fruit without going too deep and cutting the flesh. Consume the sweet white flesh within the shell.

Pink Guava: Store at room temperature to ripen.  Can be stored in the fridge to preserve a little further.  A ripe guava will be soft and give a little under slight pressure, it will also exude sweet aromas. Peel outer skin and consume the flesh within.

Rambutan:  Our Rambutans are always delivered ready to eat, as they don’t ripen much after being harvested.  They must be consumed within 2-3 days while being stored at room temperature as they don’t keep very well.  Cut a slit in the skin and gently peel open, consume the sweet flesh while discarding the inner seed.

Salak: Our Salak are delivered ready to eat and don’t ripen much once they are harvested.  They can be stored in the fridge for further preservation.  With enough power you can squash the snake fruit enough for the skin to split and be removed.  An easier method would be to make an incision longways from top to bottom and then open the entire peel.

Sapodilla: Gently squeeze the Sapodilla and if it is a little soft and indents then it is ripe.  If it is somewhat hard and firm then it is not ripe yet.  Conversely if it is very soft and squishy then it may be too ripe.  Gently use hands to tear apart the fruit or use a knife to cut it in open in half.  Consume the sweet flesh while discarding the seed.

Soursop (Graviola/Guanabana): When ripe this fruit will be soft and a dark yellow/green color.  It will also become softer as it ripens.  When very ripe brown patches will appear on the skin and will be so soft that it can be torn apart with hands.  At this stage the fruit is very sweet and has a custard like texture.

Starfruit (Carambola): Ready to eat when the fruit is bright yellow and has slight green or brown color along the ridges, the fruit should also be slightly firm to touch.  Store in the fridge once ripe to preserve further.

Tamarillo: Store at room temperature to ripen. Look for fruit with slight wrinkles which indicate ripening.  The more wrinkly the riper they tend to be so avoid consuming perfectly smooth fruit.  They should also be soft and indent slightly to pressure. Store in the fridge once ripe to preserve a little longer.  Cut ripe fruit in half and scoop out the pulp and seeds with a spoon.  This can be eaten straight with the seed also or added to other dishes.